Rain Animation Tutorial (Lightwave 3D + After Effects)

Rain Animation Tutorial (Lightwave 3D + After Effects)


Hello
Everyone and welcome to this new tutorial,
today I want to share with you how I created this rain animation video that I posted about
a week ago. So if you haven’t seen the video yet, just click on the link below,
check the video up and I’ll see you back here in a second. Alright so this is my original
scene, and for those of you that have been following my channel for a long time now,
this type of terrain will seem kind of familiar and the reason for that it’s basically because
I used the same technique that I showed you guys in the tutorial series on How to
Make a Forest Scene. So I’m not going to explain how to go about creating this terrain because
if you want to get In depth information on how to get that kind of result you can
go to that tutorial series, so I’m going to leave the link over here so that those of
you that haven’t seen that and I’ll concentrate this time on how to create the particle system
and the water ripples so let’s begin. Ok so let’s begin by checking our particle simulation,
now this is a fairly simple particle simulation, there are two key elements here
that we have to take into account, the first one is the particle system itself and the
second one is a wind modifier that I added just to add some variation to the movement
of the particle system. Now let’s check the properties for the particle system itself;
now first things first, this particle generator is slightly bigger than the terrain that I
have so for instance my terrain is 10 meters by 10 meters and my particle generator is
12 meters by 12 meters and the reason for that
is that I wanted to make sure that the particles were going to cover the totality of the terrain,
now let’s go to the properties, the particle properties and let’s see what we
did here. The first thing that I changed was that I wanted to have at least 40 particles
for each frame, so this is usually set by second so I changed that so that we had 40
particles each frame and that’s going to give us a bunch of particles at the same time.
Now, the other thing that I made sure was to set the particle limit to 10.000 because I knew we were generating quite a lot of particles
at the same time; I just wanted to make sure that we were going to have enough particles
to cover the whole animation. Now, if you saw the video, it is about 20 seconds
long but this animation is only 5 seconds long and the reason for that was that I basically
made a cycle, I repeated the same animation like 3 or 4 times, I’ll show you how to do
that later but that’s fine. So let’s continue here, now if you see here my animation, when
I move the time slider, I have particles from the very first frame and the way I did
that was simply that I changed the starting frame of my particle simulation, it is normally
set at frame 0 but I just clicked here on “fixed” and I changed the start frame from
0 to -40. Let’s go check the second tab, in here I essentially didn’t modified anything
so it’s the default values here and in motion I just changed the velocity in the
X and the Y axis so we have some sort of direction of our particles but is not as important because
we are still going to add some wind. So I just added a little bit of velocity
in the X and Y axis and I added a little bit of explosion and vibration so the particles
were a little bit erratic when they were falling. The last thing that I modified here
was the gravity, so I added some gravity in the Y axis, I added a value of -8 and that’s
how they fall. Now the other element it’s fairly simple, its a dynamic object called
wind, FX wind and I simply added the wind by coming here to Items / Dynamic Object / Wind
and I selected a Direction wind and I made sure
that the radius was 10 meters so that it covered the totality of the terrain and the power
was 100%, so as you can see it’s a fairly simple simulation. Now about the shading
I added some hypervoxels to this particles, so let’s go to the hypervoxel tab that you
can find under the volumetrics tab. My particle system is called rainfall, so I just
selected the rainfall and activated the hypervoxels for it, and in here I didn’t do anything,
as I told you before I’m a little bit lazy so I used one of the presets, and the
preset is here, the glass preset, and since particles are going to fall so fast, the glass
preset is going to look like water, so that’s how I did it, now let’s go and check on
how I created the water ripples and the water. Let’s open our surface editor, in here you’ll
see that I basically modified the water preset that comes with Lightwave, which is
this water preset that you can find under the nature tab, and I changed the color of
it just the same way I did on the forest tutorial and after that I came here to the transparency
channel and added some transparency using a gradient. Now, what I wanted to achieve
here was that I wanted the water to be slightly transparent on the top and get a little bit
murky towards the bottom. To do that I added a gradient, I made sure that the input parameter
was surface thickness. It starts at 0 meters, which is the surface itself, and it ends
at 1 meter, so the top of the water is going to have a value of 70% and the bottom is going
to have a value of 0% and that was basically it. The trick to get the ripples it’s
modifying the bump tab, now the bump tab for the water preset only comes with a crumple
procedural texture which is the one that generates that wave effect on the surface. After
that I added another procedural texture called ripples that you can find here in the procedural
textures list and what I did here was that I preserved the default values but
I changed the layer opacity to 50% so we get those ripples added to the crumple we already
have and of course, I set the blending mode to additive. And last but not least, the
trick to get ripples is on another procedural texture called crust. Crust is a procedural
texture that is going to allow us to get that little ripple effect, now what I did here
was that I modified the scale of this procedural texture because as you can see over here in
the preview the ripples are huge, so I just change this value from 1 meter to 0.2
meters so the scale makes a little bit more sense and after that I changed the position
of it and animated it on an envelope. Now, the trick is that you have to understand that
procedural textures work in 3D space which means that you can move them in the Z axis,
the Y axis and the X axis and they are going to act as if they were in 3D space, so what
I did here was that I came here to the Y axis,
I pressed the E of Envelope, and I changed the Y position over time so at frame 0 nothing
is going on, the value is 0, and in frame 120 it moves down 2 meters and that’s how
I did that, so the procedural texture moves over time 2 meters down. And that’s how you
get that sort of ripple animation on the water. Now, as I told you before, this animation
is only 5 seconds but the video itself is 20 seconds so we are going to take a look
on how I created the edit or the comp for this video
in After Effects so I’m going to close this one down, I’m going to open my scene in After
Effects and I’ll see you there. So we are now in After Effects and we are going to take
a quick look to what I did to complete this
animation. The first step was to color correct this, so I added some leves and curves adjustment
to get some more contrast out of the original render, after that I added an adjustment
layer where I used a CC Rainfall effect that is going to give the illusion that there are
more particles than the ones that I originally rendered from Lightwave; After
that I precompled these layers into 1 single layer called rocks, after that I cloned this
Layer “Rocks” and renamed it “Bloom” and what I did to this one was to add some contrast,
I desaturated this and after that I added some blurriness. I also set the transparency
to 20% and finally y Screen this copy on top of the original one to get that sort of glow
effect that sort of gives the sense of an ambience in the scene. After that I actually
precomped this two layers into one single layer
called Shape, called Background (BG) I’m sorry. This layer is actually the one where I extended
the animation so, as you can see over here, there are 3 copies of the very same
sequence. When one of the sequences is finishing the other one is starting, now if you take
a closer look there is a big jump or a big gap between animations and that’s because
there is not a perfect loop, so in order to solve this little jump I used a little trick,
I added a new adjustment layer where I applied a couple of effects. The first effect that
I applied was a CC Lens effect, so if I turn this one off you can see what the CC Lens effect
does, it gives the impression that it was actually shot on camera, after that I added
some noise and noise is simply to add some grain and noise to the render so it doesn’t
look as perfect and finally I added some animated exposure. If you take a look at the
keyframes over here, the animation of the exposure happens right when the transition
is happening, so while you are distracted by the lightning the transition between sequences
is happening, so that’s the way I hide the transition. After that I precomped all these
layers once again and I called this one “shake”. The reason for this one to be called shake
its because I scaled this up and used a wigglerama effect to give the feeling that it was there
was a handheld camera filming and of course I extended this so you first listen to
the rain and the lightning and then the whole thing shows up and then it fades out. The
last thing you should know is that I added a vignette on top, and this also gives the
illusion that it was shot on camera and that it has a little bit more depth, so this is
how it was done. Well, I hope this was useful to all of you, don’t forget to subscribe to
my channel where you will be able to find some other useful tutorials. If you have any
questions regarding this topic don’t hesitate to ask me and I hope to see you next time.

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7 Replies to “Rain Animation Tutorial (Lightwave 3D + After Effects)”

  1. Great tuto amigo , this little trick about start frame of emitter on minus values could be handy in future. I ll give it a try with a little lake, I ll show you the results later on. 

  2. Nice Tutorial David thanks! On your precomp where you have three copies of the animation – why not just reverse that's layer so the middle part basically runs backwards? That way there would be a seamless transition from zero to 5 seconds, then 5 seconds to zero, then 0 to 5 again? I think that would work.

  3. Really enjoying your tutorials.  Since some are water related, I was wondering if you could do a flowing river (around a bend) tutorial?

  4. Can you please do a complete tutorial on the after effects end of the rain animation because I am new to after effects
    Thank You

  5. how to create forest first…i'm a new user of lightwave, i don't know atleast how to start with that. please create animation from beginning to make me understand thanq

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