How to Make PowerPoint Presentations Compliant 30 Minute Mentor Monday Part 3

How to Make PowerPoint Presentations Compliant 30 Minute Mentor Monday Part 3


OK This is the NCCC compliance
project funded by the Innovation Instruction Technology Grants through
Open SUNY or through I should say SUNY and this particular one is going to be
about making powerpoints compliant and this is the third in our series. You can see
by the list that we have three more to go after this. Alright some of the
stuff you’ve seen any of the other videos PowerPoint has an accessibility checker
just like you have in Microsoft Word and underneath your File menu in your
information area you have the option to go in and check for issues. What
we’re gonna be talking about is some common issues that are going to pop up
when you have content within PowerPoint. So I will be putting
this PowerPoint along with the slides out on our blog. Now just like any other
text within any documents you have to be concerned with what font you used the
font sizes and in PowerPoint you actually want to keep your font size no
small in size 16 ok and that will make a difference also if you’re doing a
presentation and it’s going to be projected up on an overhead. It’s always
a good idea to check your font sizes based on size of the room and basically if you keep your your fonts at least 16 should be ok but double check where
you’re going to be doing your presentations because it will make a
difference. OK We have the same thing that we had in
the Word documents that you should be using Sans-serif fonts like Arial, Tahoma
and Calipari as opposed to what used to be our common ones the Times New Roman the Baskerville and the Book Antique. I did show an example here of the red and green. If you have a student that is color blind red and green will look the same or if you print it out what
you think is accented does accent as well. Especially red this red text a
little bit lighter gray so it doesn’t show up as an accent to somebody who is
color blind or if after print out the slides. So that’s something you have to
worry about with with students are color blind. And also remember that you want to
make your slides user-friendly through Universal Design. So
using too much color can be an issue with different learning abilities
different learning issues so keep that in mind if you go on and put too many
colors on a slide. Alright, just like any other documents avoid using red and green.
Avoid using blue text because blue text is usually used for links. Don’t use
underlying unless it is a link because students when they go to look at a
document or PowerPoint if they see an underline they assume it is a link. If
you’re gonna accent color you really should accent in color and make it bold as well. So those are the same things that you had in all your other documents. Weather it be Word, PowerPoint, or a PDF. Also keep in mind you should always print out your documents on a black white printer so you can
see the colors are being lost or the accents are no longer there when it
prints in black and white. Specific to PowerPoint your outline view
it’s always a good idea to look at your outline view at your sides to see if the
text that you want to use and be represented on each slide is actually
showing in the outline view. If it’s not often a screen reader will not read
that text. So it’s always important to go on and check that outline view and make
sure it’s there. Now if you have graphics if there’s a very detailed graphics you
should have it with Alt Text on it for one thing or put something in the notes
section on a slide as well to describe what that picture or diagram is. So that’s another thing that if you have text not showing up in the outline view
about an object. You gotta make sure that you document that on the slide so the
screen readers will read that through the ALT Text. Or like I said something in a note area as well. Make
sure that all your sides have a unique title. Screen readers will go through and
read the slides by title. So if you have a bunch of slides with the same title
it doesn’t make it very descriptive to the screen readers of the person who’s
trying to help the screen readers read the information. So that’s another thing
to make sure of. The screen readers can skim through the slide titles. So it
just makes it easier for them to review the information they want to go back to
specific slide if they know the slide title. So that’s another thing and I my
diagram here if you go into the View tab and outline view that’s how you will be
able see the text that shows up on a slide. Now I will say something if you
have publisher content and you’ve grabbed slides from them PowerPoint slides often they will just
use a blank slide and just add pictures in text boxes and things like that. That
makes it totally non ADA compliant. So it’s very important to make sure that you can
see the text in the outline view that you want to screen readers to read. The other
thing you want to be concerned with is your slide layout. Now if you go to the
Home tab and go to layout there are I think there’s like 12 different options of
different slide layouts you can have. It’s always recommended that use a layout
that will cover all the material on each slide. So for example if you have a
slide this is going to have a title, text and an image. You would want to use a layout that
shows placeholders for all three of those. This way when the screen readers go
through and read the slide it grabs each piece and each object on that slide and reads the information. If its image you can make sure you at Alt Text so the screen
reader will read the Alt Text that goes with it. So it’s important to make sure that you have the placeholders. If you use a blank slide or even a slide that has like a title and
one place holder and then you add an image that doesn’t have a place holder
with it the screen readers might not read it. OK so it’s very important to make sure
that you use the right layouts and you want to avoid using blank slides and
just any images or text boxes to those blank slides. Then again that’s an area where some of the publisher content uses that and when you go to to
the view and go to outline view you’re not seeing anything on any of the slides
and a lot of cases. So you want to be very careful of that. As always any
pictures, charts, links, diagrams, they all require Alt text and anything that if
you right click on any of those objects. I can show you the screen here, when you right click on an image usually format pictuer or format object and if you go into the
size of properties you have the option of Alt text. I would recommend putting
in the title for the actual image and then a description. Especially if it’s
something like a graph. So you want to describe what that graphic showing two
students especially if the screen reader going to go through and read the
Alt text on that image. Alright if you use a lot of images that
are basically just for enhancement of the slide that’s not recommended. You’re you’re better off using something
that really means something to particular slide and will make a lot
easier on the screen readers if you don’t clutter the slide with a lot of information. Using tables in PowerPoint, this is
actually easier than using a table in Microsoft Word because when you actually
add a table to PowerPoint it automatically does two things. It puts in the first row
as a header row automatically and that header row does two things. The header row it’s what makes it compliant so that’s automatically setup. You don’t have to do it as a header row like you did
in Microsoft Word. They do offer a lot of different styles for the colors on your
your table. You should be very careful about the styles you pick even though they’re
giving you a bunch of styles that you pick it doesn’t necessarily that they’re all ADA compliant. So
you wanna make sure that if a student was color blind that it would be able to
distinguish between me with a header row and the rest of the information. If you
use like every other row a different color sometimes there might be a little
bit too much for somebody who has issues with ADA like, Lynn what is the name of that if a student hands on auditory problem. ADD, Attention Deficit Disorder. Yeah I mean they might have a problem if you add too much detail to much color to a table. (Lynn) So evenif they have Asperger’s or anything like that too. So the little detail the
better you use on your tables the better. So if you use like the grid lines and maybe color just the heading and leave the rest of the table. Sometimes I find that like doing grey every other line makes it easier to read especially if it’s a large table. This way students can you know keep place within the table
easier. But those are my things that I like to see but you know using tables in
PowerPoint are not an issue. The other thing you gotta do is you do have
to do Alt Text on your tables. So if you right click on your, there’s
like a four prong arrow or you can go to the edge of the table and go into format
the table and do the Alt Text. I think I have that on the next slide. But let me
finish what’s on here. You don’t want to add the heading of the table within the
table because what we often do is merge the top row and that’s not recommended.
What they recommend in PowerPoint is putting the name of the table as the
actual title on the slide and then the first row should be you’re heading for
each column. They also don’t recommend splitting cells. So this is something
that’s done periodically where you want to separate cells within one. You might
want to split it and they say to avoid that because screen readers have a
problem when it gets to that. Be careful about leaving blank rows or
blank cell. Screen readers can have a problem and it can assume that it’s done
reading the table if it hits a blank row or a blank cell. You can change row heights or
column widths to make it look like there’s more space for a heading or
something like that. So stay away from that. We talked about the colors and the
tables. and trying not to use too many colors. I know some of the tables have the
option like the black background with white lettering and there might be okay for doing a
presentation on an overhead but when a student goes to print it out you might
lose the contrasts you wanted to have within that table. So keep that in mind. Alright this is the Alt Text area. So if
you right click on the four prong arrow. It brings you into the option to format
the shape and you would go to your size and properties again and set up the ALT Text.
Now tables hopefully won’t need too much of an explanation for a table. Hopefully a table pretty much speaks for itself. I would recommend going in and running a screen
reader on a table and see if it actually does what you think it should be doing.
Alright another big thing is embedded objects. You can actually embed Word
documents, other PowerPoint presentations, videos, charts from like an Excel
spreadsheet things like that into a PowerPoint presentation. They
actually recommend ADA compliance to create a link to edit that object
instead of embedding it. So if you’re going to put a let’s say YouTube video in
there. You should actually just create part of your slide as the link to the
video. That way when they click on it and take some out to YouTube and put
them into the video out there. If it’s a chart I would recommend maybe having the chart sitting out in you could do an image of the chart but you could
actually create a link to that image so that when you click on it it will actually
go out to a Google doc with that image in it. Or it will open an Excel spreadsheet with that chart in it and things like that. So there’s other ways around embedding
objects and one of the reasons why they say the screen readers it makes it hard
for students to know that those objects are there and if the link at least it
will link them out to that particular object to work with. So that’s what’s recommended for any of the embedded objects. The other thing is it can’t be accessible through
the keyboard and you if you have students have dexterity problems with
their hands and they have to use a joystick or other devices to click on
things they might have a problem clicking on a video to activated. A link they could actually go through the
keyboard to activate that particular link on this so that’s another reason
why they don’t recommend embedding objects. File format, you can set it up so
that students download a PowerPoint Viewer but they actually recommend
offering the PowerPoint as a PDF for students who don’t have that as an
option on the computer. So I would actually recommend any PowerPoints you
offer in your class, offer them as a PPT which is a normal PowerPoint extension or also
offer it as a PDF version of the file. Now I recently I put a lot of text on my
slides in the notes area and the PDF format doesn’t give that students. So
what I did was I exported the PowerPoint into a Word document there’s an option
export in your file format and it created the notes so it actually gave
each student an image of the slide and then on the right hand side and actually gave
them the note text that went along with it. So if you’re going to do something like
that and put in a lot of notes you students to see you might want to save it in that file format and then that can be saved as a PDF through Word. So that’s another option and this also gives them different file formats to print to make
it easier for them. If you go to PowerPoint you try to print it out you do have a lot of different
options to print and if they’re not real familiar with PowerPoint it would make a
little bit harder for them. Alright so here’s our resources that are
available if you have any questions about how to use what we’re doing. How to
make a PowerPoint Buff State is a great option. They have different webinar on
to make a PowerPoint a accessible, how to make Word document, and a PDF accessible. Lynn I know I went
through that real fast. Was there any questions that you had as I went through. I could go back slides if I need to. (Lynn) No I think this is a good overview with the PowerPoint. I know that you had some
questions about embedded documents are embedded objects that that answer that? (Lynn) Ya it was pretty clear for me. I was just confused the few things with PowerPoint
so now that helped clarify. Alright so I think we’re gonna make this short and I will send out the recording.

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