Animating in Flame – P1 – Fundamentals & Channel Sliders – Flame 2020.1

Animating in Flame – P1 – Fundamentals & Channel Sliders – Flame 2020.1


Hi everyone, Grant for the Flame Learning Channel. In this set of videos… we are going to be looking at some of the fundamentals of animation in the Flame products. We’ll be starting with the basics… As well as covering some tips and tricks… That will help you along. Once you get your head around the animation tools… You’ll find that they are quite powerful… And this will enable you… to tweak and refine your animations… to exactly what you want. You can animate values throughout the application… So please feel free to use your own media and graphics to follow along. I am using the Action compositor to demonstrate the functionality… But this could be in the Timeline, Effects Environment… Or anywhere you’ll find a channel slider and the Animation Editor. So let’s get started. Now like most applications… In order to create animation in Flame… You need to set points… Or what we call “keyframes”. These are a set of different values… And Flame takes care of the animation for you… between the keyframes. So that’s how Flame knows how to create an animation. However more importantly… You have two methods when it comes to working with animation keyframes. You have an automatic method… And a manual method. To work with animation automatically… You enable the AUTO KEY button. When this is on… Any adjustments you make… Will automatically set a new keyframe… or adjust an existing one. For example, on the first frame… I’ll position the graphic to the left of the screen. This creates a keyframe on the x-position channel. Now I’ll go to the end of the composition… And position the graphic to the right of the screen. This creates the second keyframe… And straight away as you scrub the time-bar… You can already review the animation. You could continue to add more keyframes and animate your graphic… But this is all based on AUTO KEY being enabled. As soon as you turn AUTO KEY off… Automatic keyframing is no longer possible. So if you adjust any non-animated channels over time… No keyframes will be created… And therefore no animation will take place in that channel. Very importantly… If the AUTO KEY button is off… And you adjust an animated channel… You will see the new adjustment… But it is not updating the current animation. For instance… I’ll move the graphic in the composition. Note the colour in the slider is orange. This indication means you are trying to adjust an animation… But any adjustments you make… Will not change the animation. As soon as scrub the time-bar… The channel will snap back to the original animation… Because you have not updated the keyframes… And therefore your new adjustment is ignored. So the orange indication is letting you know… That you’re trying to adjust an animated channel. But in order for the adjustment to affect the animation… You need to affect the keyframes… Either using automatic keyframing with AUTO KEY… Or manually setting a keyframe after you’ve made the adjustment. Please remember this as a distinct difference between an animated channel… And a non-animated channel. Now the second method of animating… Is manual keyframing. For example, you go to a specific frame… And make an adjustment in the slider. This can be in either an animated or non-animated channel. Without AUTO KEY on… You right-click on the slider for the context menu… And set a keyframe at the current value. This commits the adjustment to a keyframe at the current frame… And you can see this by the yellow indication in the slider. Just to reinforce the concept of manual keyframing… move further down to another frame… And adjust the value again. Right-click and set a keyframe. So those are the two methods of adding and adjusting animation keyframes… And your channel sliders will update based on the animation. These behaviours are the same throughout the application. In terms of looking at the keyframes over time… You can see them in the time-bar… Without having to look at the Animation Editor. This is based on channel selection. So if you hold SHIFT… And click on a particular channel… Its keyframes will appear in the time-bar. As a tip, you could also hold CONTROL+SHIFT… And select more than one channel at a time… And all the selections will display their keyframes in the time-bar. This is important… because not only can you see the keyframes over time in the time-bar… You can also press the next and previous keyframe buttons… To navigate the keyframes. So if you have lots of channels with loads of keyframes… You can select specific channels to display… And then navigate them without distractions. Now if you didn’t want animation in a channel… Or you accidentally animated a channel… You can hold CONTROL+ALT… And click on that channel… to reset it. This can also be done using the context menu. You can reset it to the default value… Which is this case would be 0. Or you could reset it to the current value… Which wipes out any animation in the channel… But keeps the value adjustment from the current frame. You can also reset channels in the Animation Editor… But we’ll get to that later in the series. Finally, before you move onto the next video… I would like to cover some feedback indications… When it comes to animation. So even without going into the Animation Editor in Flame… You’re able to look at the channel sliders… And see where and how animation is being applied. For instance, when you see a slider with no indications at all… Like the scale channels, for example… This means they are not animated… And they are currently at their default value of 100%. As soon as you adjust any channel… You will see an asterisk symbol next to the value… And this will indicate that this channel has been adjusted. However the channel is not animated over time. The way you determine which channels are animated… Is through the colour indications you saw earlier. Now obviously each colour has a slightly different meaning. For example, when you see a yellow line under the number… This indicates that there is animation on this channel… And you are currently on a keyframe at the current frame. If you were to scrub to the time-bar to the middle of the composition… the line turns blue. This means that the channel is animated… But you’re not on a keyframe at the current frame. So you can quickly identify an animated channel… And determine whether you’re on a keyframe or not. You also saw the orange indication earlier… Which means you’ll lose an adjustment… If you don’t use AUTO KEY… or explicitly add or amend the keyframe at this frame. The other indication you may see on a channel slider… is an expression. This is a mathematical way to create animation… And it’s represented by a dotted line in the channel slider. For instance, I’ll copy an animated channel using the context menu. If I right-click on another channel… The context menu will allow you to paste the animation… Which makes an independent copy of the original animation… Or you can link the channels… Which creates a basic expression. You can see the dotted indication on the slider… And when you scrub the time-bar… The animation channels are linked mathematically… And the graphic moves diagonally. Simply put, the value of one channel is equal to the value of the other. If you were to adjust the original channel… It would affect the other channel via the expression. This is just a simple demonstration of how expressions work… And these can be edited in the animation editor. If you want to focus primarily on expressions… Please watch the “animation expression” series… on the Flame Learning Channel. For now, you can CONTROL+ALT+CLICK the slider to reset the channel… And remove the expression. In the next video on animation… You’ll move onto the Animation Editor… Where you’ll have even more control… Over keyframes, curves… And other animation tools. Comments, feedback and suggestions are always welcome and appreciated. Please subscribe to the Flame Learning Channel… And click the bell to be notified for future videos. Thanks for watching… and hope to see you soon.

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